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Posts Tagged ‘Jane Austen’

I know, I know, I missed it again! This school year is already kicking my butt (literally, I fell down the stairs at school today like a ding-dong!) so I just didn’t have the strength Tuesday or Wednesday when I got home to update and do my TTT post even though I already had it rough drafted out on notebook paper. So, here it is, two days late, my TTT for the week of 814/12:

Romances that I believe would survive this crazy real world we live in:

10. Alice and Charlie from American Wife by Curtis Sittenfeld.

           
image from socionix.com

I was a big fan of the former first lady at one time. She reminded me a lot of myself. I guess I still am a fan, somewhat. I don’t care at all for her husband. I did care a great deal for this book though. It’s a fictionalized account of the relationship that blossomed between Laura and George, including all the gory details of a car crash caused by Mrs. Bush herself as a teenager. Having loved Sittenfeld’s first novel, Prep, I bought this one with the same expectations. However, this is a very different breed of book than Prep, though I did end up enjoying both. I do think that Charlie (George) and Alice (Laura) would have made it it reality, because..well… they did!

9. Jacob Black and Bella Swan from the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer

        
image from fanpop.com

I choose Jacob over Edward because I am a huge member of Team Jacob (I’m wearing my Quileute Tribe shirt right now) but also because I believe that they would have ended up together in reality. After Edward hit the road, Jack in New Moon and Bella and Jacob became closer, I really believe that they would have stayed together in reality. Being abandoned and dumped the way Bella was, I just can’t believe she’d go back to him. Oh, well, at least Jake got a happy ending, too.

8. Marlena and Jacob from Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

    
image from wwhan12.wordpress.com

If you fall in love over any animal, especially an elephant, it’s just gonna last forevs.

7. Elinor and Edward from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

     

Maaaaannnnn, I wanted these two together the whole darn book. One was so shy and proper and the other was so bent on honoring his promises that they were willing to be apart if needed. Thank goodness it wasn’t needed and they got to be together in the end!

6. Gilbert and Anne from Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maude Montgomery

   
image from fanpop.com

This movie was on television the other night and I got caught up in it again. It was the early one, where Anne moves to Green Gables and not the later one where she and Gilbert end up happily ever after, but it did get me in the frame of mind of how these two were so meant for each other and that’s why I just had to include them on this list, because honestly they would so have made it in reality!

5. Allie and Noah from The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

  
image from romanceeternal.org

Sweetest couple ever. And he wrote their story down. And then he read it to her. And then they died together. And then I cried.

4. Jamie and Claire from The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon

   
image from outlandishobservations.blogspot.com

Even though this whole series is so totally unbelievable with the whole time travel thing and all, I still deeply believe that the love between Claire and Jamie would have lasted and would have survived whether in ye olden Scotland or in new modern England (or America, or Canada, or wherever in the world they find themselves).

3. Hermione and Ron from The Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling

  
image from fanpop.com

Upon my first reading of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone I knew that these two were meant fror each other.

2. Josephine March and Professor Friedrich Baher from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

   
image from tumblr.com

OF COURSE I would have one of the couples from Little Women on here and OF COURSE it would be my most favoritest gal Jo and her hunka hunka burnin’ love Prof. Baher! When I made my rough draft the other night, I originally had Laurie down as the other half of Jo’s forever heart, but then I started thinking about childhood friends and how they really rarely ever work out romantically in the end. Jo had to grow up and go out in the world and get a job and write her books and learn some more and THEN she could settle down and who better to do it with than Friedrich! This man could help her open her school and publish her books! I truly believe that they would have made it in the real world based on their relationship of mutual honesty and respect.

That’s right, there are only 9 couples on the list because as hard as I racked my noggin, I just couldn’t think of another couple to add on and I didn’t want to get sloppy by just picking some random couple (like Rhett and Scarlett. I honestly do not think that those two would have made it in the real world. Tomorrow may be another day, doll, but I think he’s gonna tell you to shove it again.) so I’m leaving it at 9. Who do you think I left off the list? Who do you think should have been left off the list?

‘Til Next Time!

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You did a fine job of hiding that crooked ace up your sleeve -Brandon Flowers

One’s happiness must in some measure be always at the mercy of chance. -Jane Austen from Sense and Sensibility

This is my second book for my Classic’s Club 50 in 5 challenge.
This is my first book for my Austen in August Reading Event.

Classic: Sense & Sensibility
Author: Jane Austen
Publication Date: 1811
Pages: 846 (nook version, don’t ask me why so many)
Publisher: Smashbooks
Where I got it: Download onto my nook from Nook store
Dates Read: August 3, 2012 to August 12, 2012
# of Stars: 5/5

It took me a lot longer to finish up Sense and Sensibility than it really should have. There are several reasons for this and not one of those reasons is that the book is not very good or engaging- in fact, it is monstrous both. The school year started back up for me on Wednesday which took a lot of wind out of my sails and a lot of reading time out of my days. About a week before I decided to participate in the Austen in August reading even over at Roof Beam Reader’s site I had purchased a copy of the Masterpiece Theatre/BBC version of Sense & Sensibility. I simultaneously watched the episodes while reading the book. I believe that this helped me to get a visual of what was going on as well as assisted in deciphering the prose of the time that the book was written in. I had seen this version a few times on PBS and I loved it very much so there were no spoilers for me, though it would have been nice to not know that Willoughby was such a scoundrel and that Elinor was going to marry Edward after all.

Mmmmm…. Edward Ferrars….

I enjoyed this book immensly, and I am almost ashamed to write this, but it is the truth and I’m striving to be more like Elinor in my life, which in one respect is to say more honest and so I must confess: I prefer the movie version better (the Masterpiece version, as I have not seen the Ang Lee version, yet.).  I truly believe I prefer the screen version over the print because it was my first involvement with the story of the sisters Dashwood. If I had read the book first, I surely would prefer it.

My favorite thing about this story is the fact that I could have easily been Marianne (or to a lesser degree, Elinor). Even in the 1800’s in England, girls still fancied boys who are jerks and girls still had a tendency to slight the good guys! When it comes to the opposite sex I have made numerous mistakes in my years of dating. I tend to choose the Willoughby over the Colonel Brandon and then rue the wasted time and the heartbreak caused by my own dumb choice. So, I didn’t feel as embarassed and I didn’t cringe as much regarding my past mistakes in dudes since Marianne was doing the exact same thing I did at her age: impulsively falling in love, flaunting it all over town, ignoring common sense, getting the short end of the gossip stick, you know, just basically acting in love and then getting dumped for the rich (in modern language: popular) girl and mooning over it for months. However, one part made me feel a little old maid-ish and a little pissed off-ish at Marianne:

” ‘A woman of seven and twenty’ “ (Egads, I am 27 years old!) “said Marianne, after pausing a moment, ‘can never hope to feel or inspire affection again, and if her home be uncomfortable, or her fortune small” (very small, I work in public education), “I can suppose that she might bring herself to submit to the offices of a nurse, for the sake of the provision and security of a wife.'” Gulp!

I love Marianne because she is me, but my favorite characters were definitely Elinor and Mrs. Jennings. These two women are as opposite as night and day but I love them both for who they are. Elinor is so reserved and calm and cool and collected and everything that I just am not but that I strive to be. I love her for always keeping her cool and never going nuts and silently suffering heartbreak for MONTHS just to spare her sister and her mother from feeling heartbreak for her. If I’m heartbroken, I’m taking out a billboard and begging for sympathy and pity. Now, Mrs. Jennings, she is a hoot and a holler!! This is a sassy, brash little old lady that I pictured as Sophia Petrillo from the Golden Girls!

The brashness, the sauciness, the rudeness, the likability of these two ladies is what makes them the bitchin’ characters that they are. Neither of these ladies is afraid to lay on the innuendo and offend those around them, especially when it comes to relations! In addition to the talent of genuinely writing two such different characters that both become so love-able and appreciated and necessary to the rest of the story and the other characters, Austen also portrayed my favorite kind of character: the strong female. In an age of weaklings (see Bella Swan in Twilight) I am of the opinion that showing female characters, especially in this time when so much of their worth was dependent on the men in their lives. Austen blows that out of the water, and as the case with Willoughby shows, the MEN sometimes must be dependent on the WOMEN for money and status! Hu-zahhh Ms. Austen, Huzzah! Though each of her female characters are bad-ass women (even the deplorable Fanny- she knows how to turn John Dashwoods head and get EXACTLY what she wants, when she wants it, and how she wants it) they still find classy ways to tell each other to get bent, especially Elinor when dealing with that despicable Lucy Steele. This is what all women in every country and in all times should aim to be like and I am so thankful when I see these types of characters in books. So, thank you Jane for writing these characters into your works, and like Sophia would say, thank you for being a friend!

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IMAG0760Since I am participating in the Austen in August Reading Event hosted by Roof Beam Reader I decided that today’s daily picture would be a picture of my Austen-related materials (not counting what I’m getting from the library and what I have on my nook). Today after work I finished watching the BBC/Masterpiece Theatre version of Sense and Sensibility and I am about 1/3 of the way through it. Next up I think I am going to try for a biography or Northanger Abbey.

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Inspired by the fabulous ladies at The Broke and The Bookish I present to you my list of the top-ten quotes from literature:

10. “Reality continues to ruin my life.” -Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

9. “I haven’t the slightest idea how to change people, but still I keep a long list of perspective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.” -Naked by David Sedaris

8. “A person’s a person no matter how small.” Horton Hears a Who by Dr. Seuss

7. “I have great faith in fools. My friends call it self-confidence.” -Edgar Alan Poe

6. “Lord! What fools these mortals be!” -A Midsummer Nights Dream by William Shakespeare(?)

5. “If you live to be 100, I want to live to be 100 minus one day so I never have to live without you.” -Winnie the Pooh by A. A. Milne

4. “Perhaps – I want the old days back again and they’ll never come back, and I am haunted by the memory of them and of the world falling about my ears. ” -Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell

3. “You don’t understand me. I’m a teenager. I’ve got problems!” -The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

2. “Girls are so queer you never know what they mean.” -Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

1. “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.” -Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

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